Investing in the Future: Allocating Resources to Support Student Learning

February 9-10, 2010

Sheraton Station Square • 300 West Station Square Drive • Pittsburgh, PA 15219 • 412-261-2000

The aim of this session is to provide Superintendents and their senior staff ways to make the best possible decisions on today's critical issues regarding resource allocation. Recent research has documented the real dollar implications of education policies once they are implemented both inside schools and across schools within districts. These policies critically affect the education of all students with particular impact on those students needing the most support.

This working session is being held at a significant juncture of our collective endeavors to improve the future of teaching and learning in public schools. By doing so, we will strengthen our efforts to provide an effective teacher to every student. Without effective teachers, it is not possible to achieve the goal of educating every student to be college and workforce ready.

Marguerite Roza Talks About Specific Ways to Allocate Resources So They Do Not Undermine Reform Goals

Marguerite Roza

Dr. Roza's research focuses on quantitative policy analysis, particularly in the area of education finance. Her recent research has investigated spending patterns among schools within urban districts and the relationship to state and federal education spending. This research has documented inequities and inefficiencies in district spending practices and identified budgeting mechanisms for enabling strategic budgeting decisions for districts.

Ongoing studies involve investigations of spending patterns in ten cities including the impact of new allocation systems, such as student-based allocation. This work has appeared in Phi Delta Kappan, the 2004 Brookings Book on Education Policy, the Peabody Journal of Education, and NCES's Developments in Education Finance.

Ongoing studies involve investigations of spending patterns in ten cities including the impact of new allocation systems, such as student-based allocation. This work has appeared in Phi Delta Kappan, the 2004 Brookings Book on Education Policy, the Peabody Journal of Education, and NCES's Developments in Education Finance.

Over the past year, her research has directly informed education policy at the federal level. Her financial models demonstrated to policy makers how much money was needed to save teaching jobs in America, and also highlighted the cost of tenure and seniority under the current system. Roza calculated that an overall cut of 9 percent to salary expenditures in an urban district would force a cut of 13 percent of the workforce, because of newer teachers' lower salaries. Roza has published widely, testified before Congress, and calculated the human costs to our country of policies that would deprive all students - particularly those typically underserved - from the benefits of effective teachers.

Joanne Weiss, Director, Race to the Top, U.S. Department of Education and former NewSchools Partner and COO described Roza's important role in building a sound evidence base for effective policy. "Unknown to most, it is Marguerite's thoughtful analysis and financial acumen that provided much of the data to support the economic stabilization part of the stimulus package for education." Marguerite is an Aspen Institute - NewSchools Fellow.

Dr. Roza earned a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Washington. Prior to that, she served as a Lieutenant in the US Navy teaching thermodynamics at the Naval Nuclear Power School. She has a B.S. from Duke University and has studied at the London School of Economics and the University of Amsterdam.

Lauren Resnick Outlines Key Elements for Robust Learning

Lauren Resnick

Lauren Resnick is the founder and Director of the Institute for Learning and the former Director of the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research and study on the development of human and social capital has contributed to major educational efforts in this country and around the globe. In 1996, Theodore Hershberg in his Human Capital Development: America's Greatest Challenge, said that The New Standards project that she co-led was one of the few promising interventions that could indeed develop the nation's human capital. Lauren has a long-standing commitment to teachers and students. More recently, in her 2009 Wallace Foundation Distinguished Lecture, Nested Learning Systems for the Thinking Curriculum, delivered at the American Educational Research Association, Resnick argued that teachers' knowledge and skill and their beliefs about what students can learn constitute an educationally relevant and very important form of human capital which allows schools to grow more capital (student learning). She argues that some of what is being advocated in a human resources approach-hire better and incentivize-is not enough. She will talk about her theory of how human capital, social capital, and the tools for learning and instruction are inextricably intertwined and how these three elements are essential to the improvement of teaching.

You

Yes, you. We want to invite you to present at a Gallery E-Poster Session. For those of you who have found a resource allocation strategy that has potential for or has realized benefits for students, please send us an abstract (see guidelines attached on blue sheet) that we will publish for the participants and that you can talk about at this working session. This is a unique opportunity for you to share and to receive expert feedback. I think we have made the process simple yet the value to you and colleagues can be exponential.

Every session will be organized in ways that promote a conversation among the attendees and which will produce ways for the participants to support one another in achieving their goals toward achieving resource allocation that promotes better teaching and learning. Our aim is to have a very focused and fruitful interactive discussion with the speakers. Additionally, there will be other possibilities of interaction among the participants by providing time to share ideas during a Gallery Poster E-Session.